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Recycling figures raising the bar as towers tumble

When five 16 storey tower block are demolished, you would expect considerable waste to be heading back to landfill.

But in Nottingham that’s not the case. In fact thanks to the commitment and partnership working between contractors working on the city’s Building a Better Nottingham programme, just 3 per cent of the potential waste is heading to landfill.

Hucknall-based Total Reclaims and Colwick firm, Wastecycle, are together ensuring that nearly 30,000 tonnes of materials that have so far been pulled down with the tower blocks in Lenton, are either being reused on site, recycled, or taken somewhere else in the city to aid other building projects.

When Nottingham City Council (NCC) and Nottingham City Homes (NCH) embarked on the huge demolition and new build programme across the city, they called on their contractors to meet exceptional standards of recycling on-site, and minimise the environmental impact of the scheme.wastecycle demoliton site

Wastecycle’s commercial Director, Paul Clements, said: “We’re always looking for the most efficient and environmentally friendly way to sort and handle the waste we deal with.

“The tower block sites in Nottingham have of course been a challenge, but we we`re keen to work alongside NCH and Total Reclaims to get the best possible results – and at 97 per cent recycling rate, there’s very little more we could do to achieve our objectives.”

Each tower block in Lenton produces more than 9,500 tonnes of rubble, as much as possible of which is crushed on site to be used as hardcore for the new development. The remaining rubble processed into various recycled aggregate products and then moved on to sites across Nottingham, including the new A453 trunk road and the tram works.

Total Reclaims director Richard Taylor said: “The soft strip method we are using with these flats gives us the opportunity to take out as much as we can from the fabric of building, before the actual demolition of the structure begins. 

 

“By the time our demolition robots begin to take the first few floors down, we are dealing with an empty shell, and at ten floors our high reach machinery can get involved, pulling down the remainder of the building. 

 

“Once we complete demolition on this site, we expect around 9,500 tonnes to remain there as hardcore, the equivalent to one of the blocks staying in the ground where it once stood. When you’re dealing with structures of this size, it’s fantastic to know that such a small proportion of it will end up in landfill.”

Leicester:
Wastecycle
Wesley Street
Leicester LE4 5PZ

Nottingham:
Wastecycle
Enviro Building
Private Road 4
Colwick Industrial Estate
Nottingham NG4 2JT

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